The Tourist, Economist and The Dentist


Prices of property and commodities have gone up in Sanliurfa in recent years. The city that once reigned over the region with it’s military and political might now is booming because a new canal brings water to the city and its surroundings. Big dams are constructed in the region in order to give the economy in southeast Anatolia a boost. “You have to see the Ataturk Dam project”, bishop Gregorius Melke Ürek of Adiyaman said to our guides in the morning and saying such he put us on the path of the Tourist. So after breakfast we left Urfa to see the Ataturk dam in the Euphrates river. The huge dam created a lake that has submerged the upstream countryside. Although a lot of jobs are created and prices of energy have gone down, the project has a coat. For starters, the fate of Hesno d-kifo or better known as Hasankeyf is still not decided on. This ancient city (one of the oldest in the world) lies on the banks of the Tigris river. If the current plans are implemented, this city will be devoured by a lake. Many archeologists and historians believe that the huge lake formed by the Ataturk dam already has covered up important historical sites and fear the same will happen to Hasankeyf. Also, and we should consider this when debating on the future of Tur Abdin, life in small traditional villages can change. Developments are concentrated near the urban centers such as Sanliurfa, Mardin and Diyarbakir. More water, food and building supplies are needed to sustain growth in the cities. The dams also affect areas in Syria and Iraq. Fellow travellers from Syria told that each and every year the water level dropped and the amount of fish decreased. One can’t easily point a finger to the government as the lives of millions are improved. Hopefully the historical and broader value of the Beth Nahrin (aramaic for Mesopotamia) area is taken into consideration. Economics are more than creating jobs and financial wealth, it’s about the choices one makes, either a Tourist or government with its army of economists and policy makers.

After lunch we continued on the route of the Tourist on a famous pilgrim path to once again walk in the foot steps of our ancestors. With an odd 15 small dolmüs vans we were taken to Mount Nemrut. On its peak at 2100 meters above sea level the ancient Hellenestic Seleucian rulers (from king Antiochus and onwards) build a burial mound, huge statues depicting the rulers and their gods and an altar for offerings. All peoples and rulers that lived and passed through the region recognized the importance of this impressive sight, as do the tourists now. One of the oldest travellers with us, a man from Australia well in his 70s or 80s maybe, did not want to stay in the tourist center and climbed the 800 meter stone path with us, his vigorous movement was paralelled by few. We enjoyed the historical remains, the spectacular sight and especially each others company. Talking with a new friend we were wondering if the people of present day Tur Abdin visit the place, most probably not, but it will be nice to find out how they perceive the region and culture.

Our pilgrimage continued in the evening. Together with the bishop and syrian orthodox faithfull of Adiyaman we commemorated the washing of the feet by our Lord Jesus Christ. We barely fitted in the small church but it was amazing to witness this event in a place that feels just as much as home as our places of birth in the diaspora. The bishop and Dr. Tanoglu wholeheartedly welcomed us. Later after supper I talked with the doctor who is a dentist in Kharput. He told us about their endevours in Kharput where they are restoring the church of the Virgin Mary to once again, like 1000 years ago, celebrate Holy Mass there. The doctor like many others in this region never learned the Syriac Aramaic language, but together with his daughter they are trying to revive the church and language. But also in this region just like in The Netherlands and many other countries, people are preoccupied with bringing food on the table and managing the home and family first, church, language and cultural tradition are under pressure. It seemed to me the Dentist is swimming against the current, but by putting faith first and serving his church and people also in this region our people will feel save inside and outside the walls of the church. The bishop and Johny Messo, head of WCA, underlined that these can only be safeguarded if church and lay organizations work together, be it in Turkey or in any other country. At the end of the evening I greeted the old man who climbed the mountain with us and also had his feet washed during the ceremony. He left Tur Abdin 50 years ago and when I asked what was his single strongest feeling returning after so many years he said: “I am happy, because I see you all together with me”.

Both the path of The Tourist and Pilgrim can be tiring and endearing at the same time, but as Economists we have to make choices and like the Dentist we can serve our church and people no matter what our occupation or profession is.

On a side note:

  • The presentation and lecture we got about the dam was more tiring than climbing Mount Nemrut
  • My gamble not to iron my clothes at home payed off: the hotel service took care of everything
  • There was snow on Mount Nemrut, one demonstrated how they skied ‘back in the days’ without skies or boards. “Back then we only had thin shoes made of plastic, our feet became icy lumps and our moms got angry because we clappered with our teeth for hours”
  • The discussion on the best tlauhé (lentil soup) continous, Adiyaman ranks first with most travellers. There are still a couple of days left before Easter, then we will know where they taste best (yours are great too mum)

Read previous: Day 1: The Blessed City             Read Next: Day 3: The Church in distress

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