Turks still cannot come to terms with their own history


99 years ago hundreds of thousand Armenian, Greek and Aramean christians were murdered in what has become known as the first genocide of the modern era. The world stood by as the Ottomans gave Kurdish militias a free hand in cleansing Anatolia of its, mostly indigenous, Christian inhabitants. Sadder still, the modern Turkish Republic never came to terms with this dark page in its own history. Numerous Armenians and Greek fled the country and most of them could find a safe haven in their own countries. This was not an option for the remaining Arameans who have been living in the south eastern province of Mardin ever since history was recorded. They formed scattered communities all over the world. Although Erdogan has called upon them to return ‘home’, his administration has done little to provide a basis for their return. On the contrary, numerous lawsuits have been filed against monasteries and villages in an attempt to expropriate lands belonging to the small Aramean communities that remained.

Almost a hundred years have passed and even in the West the Turkish denial of the genocide is stinging like a sword (the Arameans call the events that passed ‘the times of the sword’) in the hearts of many descendants of the survivors. On April 24 a monument was taken into use at the Apostolic Armenian Church in Almelo, The Netherlands. A few hundred Turks took to the streets to protest against the use of the term ‘genocide’ and petitioned the local government to take down the monument. Seeing no results, a massive protest with nationalistic imagery only seen around football matches and elections was held last Sunday. Again, Almelo was the stage. Police counted 3000 participants. The demonstration was peaceful in nature, but its message was grim: ‘we do not acknowledge you’.

One could think that the present Turks can not be held accountable for the sins of their forefathers. But by keeping denying the events they rule out every possible form of rapprochement and reconciliation. I speak of Turks, but this has been and still is the official policy of the Turkish government. Even Turkish scholars like Taner Akçam have pointed this out and conclude that the current Turkish Republic is still responsible. It’s bad when your home country isn’t your home country, but it is even worse when deliberate policies are employed to erase the history, language and culture of the indigenous people of a country completely. Denying the right to commemorate our dead on our own properties in The Netherlands is a crime in itself.

 

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